Tag Archive for: Mentorship


The following post originally appeared on Medium. The author, Ruchi Pakhle, participated in our LFX Mentorship program this past spring.

Hey everyone!
I am Ruchi Pakhle currently pursuing my Bachelor’s in Computer Engineering from MGM’s College of Engineering & Technology. I am a passionate developer and an open-source enthusiast. I recently graduated from LFX Mentorship Program. In this blog post, I will share my experience of contributing to Open Horizon, a platform for deploying container-based workloads and related machine learning models to compute nodes/clusters on edge.

I have been an active contributor to open-source projects via different programs like GirlScript Summer of Code, Script Winter of Code & so on.. through these programs I contributed to different beginner-level open-source projects. After almost doing this for a year, I contributed to different organizations for different projects including documentation and code. On a very random morning applications for LFX were opened up and I saw various posts on LinkedIn among that posts one post was of my very dear friend Unnati Chhabra, she had just graduated from the program and hence I went ahead and checked the organization that was a fit as per my skill set and decided to give it a shot.

I was very interested in DevOps and Cloud Native technologies and I wanted to get started with them but have been procrastinating a lot and did not know how to pave my path ahead. I was constantly looking for opportunities that I can get my hands on. And as Open Horizon works exactly on DevOps and Cloud Native technologies, I straight away applied to their project and they had two slots open for the spring cohort. I joined their element channel and started becoming active by contributing to the project, engaging with the community, and also started to read more about the architecture and tried to understand it well by referring to their youtube videos. You can contribute to Open Horizon here.

Linux Foundation opens LFX mentorship applications thrice a year: one in spring, one in summer, and the winter cohort, each cohort being for a span of 3 months. I applied to the winter cohort for which the applications opened up around February 2022 and I submitted my application on 4th February 2022 for the Open Horizon Project. I remember there were three documents mandatory for submitting the application:

1. Updated Resume/CV

2. Cover Letter

(this is very very important in terms of your selection so cover everything in your cover letter and maybe add links to your projects, achievements, or wherever you think they can add great value)

The cover letter should cover these points primarily👇

  • How did you find out about our mentorship program?
  • Why are you interested in this program?
  • What experience and knowledge/skills do you have that are applicable to this program?
  • What do you hope to get out of this mentorship experience?

3. A permission document from your university stating they have no obligation over the entire span of the mentorship was also required (this depends on org to org and may not be asked as well)

The LFX acceptance mail was a major achievement for me as at that period of time I was constantly getting rejections and I had absolutely no idea about how things were gonna work out for me. I was constantly doubting myself and hence this mail not only boosted my confidence but also gave me a ray of hope of achieving things by working hard towards it consistently. A major thanks to my mentor, Joe Pearson, and Troy Fine for believing in me and giving me this opportunity.⭐

Starting off from the day I applied to the LFX until getting selected as an LFX Mentee and working successfully for over 3 months and a half, it felt surreal. I have been contributing to open-source projects and organizations before. But being a part of LFX gave me such a huge learning curve and a sense of credibility and ownership that I got here wouldn’t have gotten anywhere else.

I have been contributing to open-source projects and organizations before. But being a part of LFX gave me such a huge learning curve and a sense of credibility and ownership that I got here wouldn’t have gotten anywhere else.

I still remember setting up the mgmt-hub all-in-one script locally and I thought it was just a cakewalk, well it was not. I literally used to try every single day to run the script but somehow it would end up giving some errors, I used to google them and apply the results but still, it would fail. But one thing which I consistently did was share my progress regularly with my mentor, Troy no matter if the script used to fail but still I used to communicate that with Troy, I would send him logs and he used to give me some probable solutions for the same but still the script used to fail. I then messaged in the open-horizon-examples group and Joe used to help with my doubts, a huge thanks to him and Troy for helping me figure out things patiently. After over a month on April 1st, the script got successfully executed and then I started to work on the issues assigned by Troy.

These three months taught me to be consistent no matter what the circumstances are and work patiently which I wouldn’t have learned in my college. This experience would no doubt make me a better developer and engineer along with the best practices followed. A timeline of my journey has been shared here.

  1. Checkout my contributions here
  2. Checkout open-horizon-services repo

The LFX Mentorship Program was a great great experience and I did get a great learning curve which I wouldn’t have gotten any other way. The program not only encourages developers to kick-start their open-source journey but also provides some great perks like networking, and learning from the best minds. I would like to thank my mentors Joe Pearson, Troy Fine, and Glen Darling because without their support and patience this wouldn’t have been possible. I would be forever grateful for this opportunity.

Special thanks to my mentor Troy for always being patient with me. These kind words would remain with me always although the program would have ended.

And yes how can I forget to plug in the awesome swags, special thanks, and gratitude to my mentor Joe Pearson for sending me such cool swags and this super cool note ❤handwritten thank you note from joe pearson

If you have any queries, connect with me on LinkedIn or Twitter and I would be happy to help you out 😀





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In this blog, I will be sharing my experience of mentorship. (TLDR; just awesome, one-of-a-kind experience <3)

If you’re also applying for this (which every open-source newbie should), or have a doubt, feel free to drop me a message. I’d be more than happy to help.

What is LFX Mentorship?

Let’s start this by knowing about The Linux Foundation. The Linux Foundation (LF) is a non-profit organization, that standardizes the development of the Linux kernel and also promotes open source projects such as Kubernetes, GraphQL, Hyperledger, RISC-V, Xen project, etc.

The Linux Foundation Mentorship is a program run by LF, which helps developers with the necessary skills and resources to learn and contribute to open source projects, through 3 or 6 months of internship. During this period, the mentee is guided through the development workflow and methodologies used by open source organizations, through a project.

Selection procedure

I’ve been involved in open source for some time and have been applying for the mentorship, but got rejected every time.

This time also I was going through the projects and found a particularly interesting project. It was about parsing a protocol. This took my eye as at that time I was learning networking and experimenting a lot with communications. So naturally, I got interested. After reading the project details, I went to the project’s slack channel to find a mentor. Omid, one of Pixie’s founding engineers, was kind enough to reply to my message and asked for a quick call.

I talked to him and told him about my interest and how I made a preliminary Mongo wire protocol parser using Node.js as preparation. He seemed satisfied with this and told me about further steps and time commitment.

Other formalities included submitting a cover letter, and my resume.

A few days later got this:

LFX Hi Anubhav

Finally, after applying so many times, got selected !!!

Month 1

Started, and was introduced to my mentor Yaxiong Zhao, another founding engineer at Pixie. He told me about what we were going to do in the next 3 months. He demoed me the Pixie UI and explained to me the working of it, and how pixie catches packets (hint: eBPF). And then sent me the AMQP spec sheet, and how it needs to be implemented using C++.

Yes, the protocol changed from Mongo to AMQP, and the language from Node.js to C++. But I guess a very important survival quality of industry is being flexible.

So, in the first month, I got a theoretical knowledge about AMQP wire spec and experimented with it by deploying a tópico RabbitMQ server, and monitoring packets using Wireshark. My mentor also tried helping me build Pixie on my tópico machine, but we failed, even after switching distros. At last, we were able to set up my dev environment inside a container.

…finta a month

Month 2

In the first half of this month, I continued my research on AMQP (apparently implementing a protocol required a lot of extensive reading) and found analogies of it with protocols I was already común with, and kept on manually experimenting with packet translation.

3rd week of the month, It was finally time for me to start writing some code. Okay, so this was the difficult part. Having very limited knowledge of C++, continued forward. But my mentor was being an angel at this point, very patiently explaining to me, and pointing me in the right direction, making me understand every lex required. I started with implementing a data structure for storing and creating relations between packets. After some effort, finally got my PR merged.

AMQP types header file

Month 3

Continuing my code work, I started building a parser code. Yaxiong was very patient and helpful during this time, sending me blogs, and guides and explaining to me every little doubt I had. Thanks to him I was able to finally submit my preliminary code for parsing the code.

And a final thing for this was to write tests. Learned google’s C++ testing library. Wrote code, pushed.

Concluding the program

Like every good thing, this also came to an end. 12 weeks just fly by — faster than you can think — The program opened up a new world of open source and got me introduced to a lot of professional tools and etiquette. I appreciate the time and efforts my mentor put into this program.

Completing this internship was a dream come true, dodging tonnes of problems: internet, college, placement preparation, exams, everything. At many points in the internship, I was very certain I won’t be able to complete the project. but:

At some point, everything’s gonna go south on you… everything’s going to go south and you’re going to say, this is it. This is how I end. Now you can either accept that, or you can get to work. That’s all it is. You just begin. You do the math. You solve one problem… and you solve the next one… and then the next. And If you solve enough problems, you get to come home.

— Tail ender, The Martian.



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